Practical Sustainability: Lessons from African Indigenous Cultures

In this episode of Resistance Radio, Derrick Jensen speaks with  Helga Vierich. Helga Vierich did her doctorate at University of Toronto, after three years of living with Bushmen in the Kalahari. Then she was hired as principal anthropological research scientist at a green revolution institute in West Africa. Subsequently she has been teaching at the … Continue reading Practical Sustainability: Lessons from African Indigenous Cultures

The Farms of the Future


Editors Note: At Deep Green Resistance, we have a fundamental critique of agriculture, which is the most destructive activity human beings have ever done. However, horticulture, permaculture, and small-scale cultivation of biodiverse polycultures can be done in a sustainable way that enhances local ecology. This food source will be essential as industrial food systems collapse … Continue reading The Farms of the Future


Understanding The Yellow Vests Movement and Its Stakes From an Ecological Perspective

By Black Ouioui, a French DGR sympathizer / Image: Norbu Gyachung, CC BY 4.0 The yellow vests movement has been struggling for six month now. Half a year. This is a record-breaking movement in France by its length. Commentators no longer refer to the May 1968 movement, but go back to several democratic protests that … Continue reading Understanding The Yellow Vests Movement and Its Stakes From an Ecological Perspective

Indigenous Children are Dying at the U.S./Mexico Border

Editors Note: the international refugee crisis is driven by war, imperialism, and destruction of the planet. In other words, it is driven by civilization, or “the culture of empire.” DGR is opposed to empire and we see the refugee crisis as a humanitarian emergency. We believe that the best way to fight this crisis is … Continue reading Indigenous Children are Dying at the U.S./Mexico Border

Climate Change: Why is it so often “sooner than predicted”?

by Kollibri terre Sonnenblume / Macska Moksha Press, republished with permission A June 15th headline elicited feelings in me of both shock and déjà vu: “Climate change: Arctic permafrost now melting at levels not expected until 2090” [Independent, June 15, 2019].  Shock because that’s quite a bit ahead of time. Déjà vu because how often … Continue reading Climate Change: Why is it so often “sooner than predicted”?

Unprecedented Global Heat Waves are the “New Normal”

By Max Wilbert Heat that was once unthinkable is now becoming commonplace. In the three decades I have been observing weather in my native Pacific Northwest, heat that used to come once a decade now comes every year. Most people I speak with have the same experience. As usual, climate science lags behind observations. According … Continue reading Unprecedented Global Heat Waves are the “New Normal”

Questioning Unquestioned Beliefs: What the Lake Erie Bill of Rights Teaches Us

By Will Falk and Sean Butler Photo: 2009 algae bloom in western Lake Erie. Photo by Tom Archer. It should be clear to anyone following the events surrounding attempts by the citizens of Toledo, OH, with help from nonprofit law firm the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF), to protect Lake Erie with the Lake … Continue reading Questioning Unquestioned Beliefs: What the Lake Erie Bill of Rights Teaches Us

Pipelines 101: An Introduction To North American Oil & Gas Pipeline Routes and Safety Concerns

Editors note: this piece is nearly 8 years old, and as such some of the statistics are out-of-date. Nonetheless, it’s a valuable primer on North American pipeline infrastructure. Republished with permission. By Ben Jervey / Desmog Blog / July 28, 2011 Over the next couple of weeks, I’m going to be rolling out a whole … Continue reading Pipelines 101: An Introduction To North American Oil & Gas Pipeline Routes and Safety Concerns

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