Places Archives: Biomes » Oceans » Arctic

Scientists raise estimate for methane releases after studying seeps in Arctic

By Sara Reardon / New Scientist Melting Arctic permafrost could put even more methane – a potent greenhouse gas – into the atmosphere than previously thought, with worrying implications for the pace of global warming. Many ice sheets that sit like caps over rock crevices trap natural seeps of methane; when they melt, the gas … Continue reading Scientists raise estimate for methane releases after studying seeps in Arctic

Methane hydrates melting due to climate change, releasing potent greenhouse gases

By Michael Marshall / NewScientist As Arctic sea ice breaks apart, massive amounts of methane could be released into the atmosphere from the cold waters beneath. High concentrations of the greenhouse gas have been recorded in the air above cracks in the ice. This could be evidence of yet another positive feedback on the warming … Continue reading Methane hydrates melting due to climate change, releasing potent greenhouse gases

Arctic ice melt may cause “bromine explosion,” depleting ozone and releasing mercury

By The State Column A new study conducted by NASA finds that Arctic ice is melting at a rate far faster than previously expected, increasing the rate of release of a number of deadly chemicals. The study, published and conducted by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, finds the oldest and thickest arctic sea ice is … Continue reading Arctic ice melt may cause “bromine explosion,” depleting ozone and releasing mercury

2011 warmest year on record in the Arctic; scientists warn of tipping points

By Jeremy Hance / mongabay.com Last year the Arctic, which is warming faster than anywhere else on Earth due to global climate change, experienced its warmest twelve months yet. According to recent data by NASA, average Arctic temperatures in 2011 were 2.28 degrees Celsius (4.1 degrees Fahrenheit) above those recorded from 1951-1980. As the Arctic … Continue reading 2011 warmest year on record in the Arctic; scientists warn of tipping points