Categories Archives: Repression at Home

The Totalitarianism of Today — Part II

In this piece, Matej Kudláčik describes how a system that appears democratic, participatory, and free can actually conceal a profound totalitarianism. His argument has similarities to Sheldon Wolin’s conception of “inverted totalitarianism,” which Wolin described as being “all politics all of the time but politics largely untempered by the political. Party squabbles are occasionally on … Continue reading The Totalitarianism of Today — Part II

Paths Forward: In Defense of “Utopian” Creativity (Part 1 of 2)

This story was first published in Learning Earthways. By George R. Price The oral traditions and origin stories of many Indigenous peoples, worldwide, include some stories of the endings of previous worlds. In such stories, the end of one world usually coincides with the beginning of a new world. Typically, the end of one world … Continue reading Paths Forward: In Defense of “Utopian” Creativity (Part 1 of 2)

Indigenous community saves Colombia’s poison dart frog from coca and logging

This story first appeared in Mongabay. Editor’s note: This is what environmental justice looks like. Not NGOs dictating what lands will be set aside for 30×30, which is just greenwashing colonialism. It is the people whose land it is making those decisions and the governments enforcing them. By Maxwell Radwin An Indigenous community in southwest … Continue reading Indigenous community saves Colombia’s poison dart frog from coca and logging

Making the connections: resource extraction, prostitution, poverty, climate change, and human rights

Editor’s note: This article has been published in The International Journal of Human Rights. Unfortunaltly we don’t have the rights to publish the whole article which is behind a paywall, but we are publishing the extract and some quotes. Featured image: The surface mine storage place, mining minerals and brown coal in different colours. View … Continue reading Making the connections: resource extraction, prostitution, poverty, climate change, and human rights

American Satyricon

This story first appeared in ScheerPost. By Chris Hedges The trial of Ghislaine Maxwell which began last week in Manhattan will not hold to account the powerful and wealthy men who are also complicit in the sexual assaults of girls as young as twelve Maxwell allegedly procured for billionaire Jeffrey Epstein. Donald Trump, Bill Clinton, … Continue reading American Satyricon

‘Victory of Global Significance’: Modi to Repeal Laws That Sparked Year-Long Farmers’ Revolt

“You Can Kill a Man, but You Can’t Kill an Idea” –  Medgar Evers This article first appeared in Common Dreams. “After a year of strikes—and having faced brutal repression that claimed some 700 lives—India’s farmers are victorious in their struggle.” By KENNY STANCIL Workers’ rights activists around the globe rejoiced on Friday after Indian Prime … Continue reading ‘Victory of Global Significance’: Modi to Repeal Laws That Sparked Year-Long Farmers’ Revolt

Indigenous mine opponents targeted in raids during state of siege in Guatemala

This story was first published in Mongabay. By Sandra Cuffe In the midst of a long conflict and recent protest over a nickel mine in El Estor, in eastern Guatemala, police have carried out more than 40 raids and 60 arrests, and the government has declared a 30-day state of emergency. Indigenous Mayan opponents to … Continue reading Indigenous mine opponents targeted in raids during state of siege in Guatemala

Indigenous Leaders Hail Biden’s Proposed Chaco Canyon Drilling Ban as ‘Important First Step’

Editor’s note: We would hope that this action would be a turning point where the United States stops its management planning philosophy of “natural resources” and focuses on the protection of all living beings. Yet how tenative only 10-mile buffer for only 20 years and does not include all extractive industries. Basically less than undoing what Trump … Continue reading Indigenous Leaders Hail Biden’s Proposed Chaco Canyon Drilling Ban as ‘Important First Step’

Dakota Access Pipeline resister stands with integrity in face of long prison sentence

Sentenced to eight years in prison for acts of sabotage, water protector Jessica Reznicek reflects on her faith-driven resistance. By Cristina Yurena Zerr This article was first published in the German newspaper taz, and has been translated and edited for Waging Nonviolence. On June 28, the federal court in Des Moines, Iowa was silent and … Continue reading Dakota Access Pipeline resister stands with integrity in face of long prison sentence

Uncontacted tribe’s land invaded and destroyed for beef production

This article originally appeared in Survival International. Featured image: Piripkura men Baita and Tamandua, photographed during an encounter with a FUNAI unit. The two men, who are uncle and nephew, have had sporadic interactions with the local FUNAI team, but returned to live in the forest. © Bruno Jorge New overflight photos have revealed that the land of one … Continue reading Uncontacted tribe’s land invaded and destroyed for beef production