Categories Archives: Culture of Resistance » Listening to the Land

[The Ohio River Speaks] Everyday Ecocide and Garden-Variety Genocide

In this writing, taken from ‘The Ohio River Speaks,‘ Will Falk shares the history and songs of the River. Through documenting the journey with the Ohio River, Will seeks to strengthens others fighting to protect what is left of the natural world. Read the first, second and third part of Will’s journey. Everyday Ecocide and … Continue reading [The Ohio River Speaks] Everyday Ecocide and Garden-Variety Genocide

Thank You Mother Earth

Jack D. Forbes (Powhatan-Renapé and Lenape) was the author of  Columbus and Other Cannibals, one of the most important books ever written. In this writing Jack Forbes offers thanks to those living with awareness of the interconnectedness of all life.  Thank you mother earth, for holding me on your breast. You always love me no … Continue reading Thank You Mother Earth

[The Ohio River Speaks] Peace: A Song the Ohio River Sings

In this writing, taken from ‘The Ohio River Speaks‘, Will Falk describes the communication, the journey and the relationship shared.  Through documenting the journey with the Ohio River Will seeks to strengthens others fighting to protect what is left of the natural world. Read the first and second part of Will’s journey. Peace: A Song … Continue reading [The Ohio River Speaks] Peace: A Song the Ohio River Sings

How Prairie Dogs Cry for Rain

How Prairie Dogs Cry for Rain: Reflections on Shelter, Rain, and Drought By Madronna Holden “If you kill off the prairie dogs, there will be no one to cry for rain.” — Traditional Navajo warning One former prairie dog town stretched 25,000 square miles with its burrows sheltering 400 million animals.  When 20th century industry encountered … Continue reading How Prairie Dogs Cry for Rain

[The Ohio River Speaks] Can a River Save Your Life?

In this writing, taken from ‘The Ohio River Speaks‘, Will Falk describes the urgency in which he seeks to protect the natural world. Through documenting the journey with the Ohio River he strengthens others fighting to protect what is left of the natural world. Read the first part of the journey here. By Will Falk/The … Continue reading [The Ohio River Speaks] Can a River Save Your Life?

[The Ohio River Speaks] Headwaters: The Journey Begins

Originally named Ohi:yo’—“beautiful river”—by the Seneca, the Ohio River is now the United States’ most polluted river. The dominant culture teaches us to view natural beings like the Ohio River as objects to be used, consumed, and destroyed for human benefit. This is a primary reason the destruction of the natural world is intensifying. How … Continue reading [The Ohio River Speaks] Headwaters: The Journey Begins

How To Begin Creating Ecological Economies

What will come after industrial capitalism? In this piece, Kara Huntermoon envisions how to begin creating ecological economies through adaptation to place. Ecological Economies by Kara Huntermoon Humans are ‘culture creatures.’ That means we evolve on two levels: biological and cultural. Biological evolution is physical adaptation to environmental stresses. All life on Earth evolves biologically. … Continue reading How To Begin Creating Ecological Economies

Romance, Revolution, and Dark Waters

In this piece of writing Rebecca shares her deep connection with nature, her journey in love, courting and listening for responses. She illuminates how a culture of resistance sown from fierce love can empower us to stop oppression and injustice. By Rebecca Wildbear Romance, Revolution, Dark Waters Do you remember the first time you fell … Continue reading Romance, Revolution, and Dark Waters

Radical Dreamwork

By Rebecca Wildbear Cottonwood trees shaded the little river, while the rising sun brightened the blue sky and lit up the expansive slopes of the Sonoran Desert, dotted with prickly pear, saguaro, and cholla cactuses. I was in Aravaipa Canyon, a gorge in the Pinal Mountains of Southern Arizona, where I would prepare thirteen people … Continue reading Radical Dreamwork