Categories Archives: Culture of Resistance » People of Color & Anti-racism

India: Prominent Indigenous Activist Violently Arrested During International Women’s Day Event

Indigenous peoples are usually at the forefront of environmental and social justice struggles. They are also the most threatened by violence directed at activists. Deep Green Resistance stands in solidarity with front line activists, particularly indigenous peoples who seek to restore human rights and protect the land and water from harm.  Featured image: Hidme Markam, an … Continue reading India: Prominent Indigenous Activist Violently Arrested During International Women’s Day Event

Corporate Colonialism and Africa’s Date with Disaster

In the following piece, Mark relates the population growth to patriarchy, exploitation, and capitalism. Editor’s note: DGR does not agree with all opinions on this article. by Mark Behrend The population of Africa is soaring. Since 1950, it has grown from 227 million to 1.343 billion — an increase of 590%. Over the same period, … Continue reading Corporate Colonialism and Africa’s Date with Disaster

How To Disappear

Disappearing can be important for people on the run from political persecution or immigration officials, from abusive relationships and stalkers, and for people involved in highly illegal political activity. This short excerpt comes from the book “Soldier of Fortune: Guide to How to Disappear and Never Be Found.“ How to Disappear and Never Be Found … Continue reading How To Disappear

Would Defunding Police Amputate Capitalism?

This piece, republished from Counterpunch, explores the current uprising against police brutality in the context of the struggle against capitalism and asks: what are the most effective forms of struggle going forward? Join the conversation in the comments section. Amputating Capitalism by Vincent Emanuele / Counterpunch “We fought a military war; our opponents fought a … Continue reading Would Defunding Police Amputate Capitalism?

The U.S. Has Always Been A Police State

What has changed in the last 400 years? Slavery is no more, segregation is illegal, and the Voting Rights Act is law. And yet poverty is everywhere in the Black community, white supremacy is ascendant, policing is murderous, and yet people call for peace. In this piece, Assata Shakur looks for peace in the status … Continue reading The U.S. Has Always Been A Police State

Equipment for Scouting and Action

Rage and violence are exploding in the streets of the United States. Eleven people have been killed, hundreds injured, and thousands arrested over the last week. Police are running wild, attacking and injuring non-violent protesters, journalists, and bystanders in their rush to protect private property. A revolt on this scale has not seen since the … Continue reading Equipment for Scouting and Action

George Floyd’s Murder: An Act Of White Supremacy

The United States is built on a foundation of slavery and indigenous land theft. Racism is deep in the bones of this country. Where there is oppression, there is resistance: the ongoing Minneapolis rebellion against the white supremacist state and police murder has spilled out across the U.S. Deep Green Resistance stands in solidarity with … Continue reading George Floyd’s Murder: An Act Of White Supremacy

The Black Community as Internal Colony: Afeni Shakur, 1970

Afeni Shakur is best known as the mother of the hip-hop artist Tupac Shakur. What is less well known is that she was a member of the Harlem chapter of the Black Panther Party, a dedicated revolutionary who served time in jail for her political activities. Freedom Archives says her work “shaped the political discourse … Continue reading The Black Community as Internal Colony: Afeni Shakur, 1970

Black Abolitionists Believed in Taking Up Arms

Long before the Civil War, black abolitionists shared the consensus that violence would be necessary to end slavery. Unlike their white peers, their arguments were about when and how to use political violence, not if. By Randal Maurice Jelks / Boston Review Reviewing “Force and Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence,” by Kellie Carter Jackson. … Continue reading Black Abolitionists Believed in Taking Up Arms

Review of Assata: An Autobiography

By Norris Thomlinson / Originally published on DGR Hawaii / Featured image by Angela Davis, CC BY 4.0 Once you understand something about the history of a people, their heroes, their hardships and their sacrifices, it’s easier to struggle with them, to support their struggle. For a lot of people in this country, people who … Continue reading Review of Assata: An Autobiography