Categories Archives: Biodiversity & Habitat Destruction

Indigenous Leaders Hail Biden’s Proposed Chaco Canyon Drilling Ban as ‘Important First Step’

Editor’s note: We would hope that this action would be a turning point where the United States stops its management planning philosophy of “natural resources” and focuses on the protection of all living beings. Yet how tenative only 10-mile buffer for only 20 years and does not include all extractive industries. Basically less than undoing what Trump … Continue reading Indigenous Leaders Hail Biden’s Proposed Chaco Canyon Drilling Ban as ‘Important First Step’

Uncontacted tribe’s land invaded and destroyed for beef production

This article originally appeared in Survival International. Featured image: Piripkura men Baita and Tamandua, photographed during an encounter with a FUNAI unit. The two men, who are uncle and nephew, have had sporadic interactions with the local FUNAI team, but returned to live in the forest. © Bruno Jorge New overflight photos have revealed that the land of one … Continue reading Uncontacted tribe’s land invaded and destroyed for beef production

Human Rights Depend on a Thriving Natural World

This article first appeared in The Revelator. Editor’s note: It would seem like these rights would be self evident birth rights unrequiring of institutions agency. Unfortunately like all UN resolutions this carries no enforcement, see Palestine. How can enviromental justice come about? Rich nations must stop outsourcing their luxury lifestyle. This does not mean NIMBY Not … Continue reading Human Rights Depend on a Thriving Natural World

Indigenous Papuans won their forest back from a palm oil firm, but still lack land title

This article originally appeared in Mongabay. Editor’s note: The strong focus on mapping forests mentioned in this article makes one suspicious. Mapping is needed for governments to control “natural ressources” and give concessions to companies to exploit them. It was never needed for indigenous populations, so far as, since they’ve known their landbase for millenia. … Continue reading Indigenous Papuans won their forest back from a palm oil firm, but still lack land title

Deep seabed mining is risky. If something goes wrong, who will pay for it?

This story first appeared in Mongabay. Editor’s note: O Canada! Welcome to the new wild west. If you liked Deepwater Horizon you will love Deep Sea Mining. This statement pretty much sums it up, “countries could have their chance to EXPLOIT the valuable metals locked in the deep sea.” Corporations love to deal with poorer, less developed countries … Continue reading Deep seabed mining is risky. If something goes wrong, who will pay for it?

Electric Vehicles: Back to the Future? [Part 1/2]

By Frédéric Moreau In memory of Stuart Scott Each year while winter is coming, my compatriots, whom have already been told to turn off the tap when brushing their teeth, receive a letter from their electricity supplier urging them to turn down the heat and turn off unnecessary lights in case of a cold snap … Continue reading Electric Vehicles: Back to the Future? [Part 1/2]

Political Prisoner Support for Ruby Montoya and Jessica Renzicek

By Max Wilbert On July 24th, 2017, Ruby Montoya and Jessica Renzicek made a public statement admitting that they had carried out multiple acts of sabotage against the then-under-construction Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in Spring 2017 during the #NoDAPL #StandingRock movement. The two activists set fire to heavy machinery and used blow torches to damage … Continue reading Political Prisoner Support for Ruby Montoya and Jessica Renzicek

Changes to global fisheries subsidies could level the playing field for traditional coastline communities

This story first appeared in Mongabay. by Gladstone Taylor Community fishers struggle to hold their own against heavily-subsidized foreign fleets. Fisheries subsidies have long given wealthy nations an edge over Small Island Developing States (SIDS) like Jamaica that are rich in fishing traditions and natural resources. In places like the multigenerational fishing village of Manchioneal, Jamaica, … Continue reading Changes to global fisheries subsidies could level the playing field for traditional coastline communities

Indigenous understanding of Salween River key for biodiversity

This story first appeared in The Third Pole. By Saw John Bright. This week, governments from around the world will convene online for the first part of the UN Biodiversity Summit COP15 (the second part will take place partially in-person in Kunming in spring), which will agree on the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework. Framed as … Continue reading Indigenous understanding of Salween River key for biodiversity

This Amazon dam is supposed to provide clean energy, but it’s destroying livelihoods and unique species

This story first appeared in The Conversation. By Brian Garvey and Sonia Magalhaes. The Volta Grande region of the Amazon is a lush, fertile zone supplied by the Xingu River, whose biodiverse lagoons and islands have earned its designation as a priority conservation area by Brazil’s Ministry of the Environment. But a recent decision by the Federal Regional … Continue reading This Amazon dam is supposed to provide clean energy, but it’s destroying livelihoods and unique species