Categories Archives: The Problem: Civilization

Mauna Kea: What it is, why it’s happening, and why we should all be paying attention

Nikki Sanchez / Intercontinential Cry Featured image: Tim Rawle, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 At the base of Mauna Kea, the world’s tallest mountain and the first point on earth where raindrops touch the earth, the largest land defense action in modern Hawaiian history is currently in taking place and the entire movement is being guided by … Continue reading Mauna Kea: What it is, why it’s happening, and why we should all be paying attention

Native Youth Movement Statement on Social Media

Editor’s Note: this piece comes from the Native Youth Movement, a cross-nation warrior society for indigenous youth on Turtle Island. We do not agree with every detail of this piece, but consider it a good primer on this topic and a look at how traditionally-minded indigenous people are approaching the internet, social media, pornography, and … Continue reading Native Youth Movement Statement on Social Media

Environmental Protector Murdered in the Philippines

Image: PRO MIMAROPA by Liam Campbell Forest ranger Bienvinido “Toto” Veguilla, Jr. was murdered last week while attempting to stop illegal loggers from ransacking a section of forest in the Philippines. Veguilla was on a routine patrol in the Sitio Kinawagan, Barangay Pasadeña region when he and fellow rangers discovered a group of illegal loggers … Continue reading Environmental Protector Murdered in the Philippines

Are Humans Inherently Destructive?

By Max Wilbert / Featured Image: San People in southern Africa making friction fire. Photo by Isewell, used under the CC BY-SA 2.5 license. Are humans inherently destructive? Are we, as a species, some sort of  cancer on the planet? Are we “destined” to destroy the planet because we are “too smart” and  “too successful”? … Continue reading Are Humans Inherently Destructive?

Ruin of the American West: An Interview with Chris Ketcham

Featured Image: thousands of acres of Pinyon-Juniper forest bulldozed by the BLM in Nevada / by Max Wilbert / CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Christopher Ketcham is a freelance writer for Harper’s, The New Republic, Vice, and many others. This video is an interview between him and Deep Green Resistance co-founder and author Derrick Jensen.  They discuss … Continue reading Ruin of the American West: An Interview with Chris Ketcham

War on the Amazon Rainforest

By Max Wilbert The Amazon Rainforest is on fire. But the fire is merely a symptom of deeper problems, not root cause. Therefore, simply putting out the fires does not solve the problem.  To protect the Amazon rainforest, we need a deeper understanding of threats to it. For this, we turn to the indigenous people, … Continue reading War on the Amazon Rainforest

Patriarchy is an Environmental Issue

Editors Note: This essay by Deep Green Resistance co-founder Lierre Keith was originally published on the DGR News Service in August 2015 under the title, “The Girls and the Grasses.” We think it an exceptional piece, and would like to share it again. [Photo by Max Wilbert, CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.] by Lierre  Keith Captured in … Continue reading Patriarchy is an Environmental Issue

What is Controlled Opposition

Image credit: Jared Rodriguez / TruthOut by Liam Campbell “The best way to control the opposition is to lead them.” – Vladimir Lenin If you go online and search for “controlled opposition” you will find over 2 million results, and essentially all of them are garbage. This is a tactic which has been used throughout … Continue reading What is Controlled Opposition

Review of Assata: An Autobiography

By Norris Thomlinson / Originally published on DGR Hawaii / Featured image by Angela Davis, CC BY 4.0 Once you understand something about the history of a people, their heroes, their hardships and their sacrifices, it’s easier to struggle with them, to support their struggle. For a lot of people in this country, people who … Continue reading Review of Assata: An Autobiography

Defending Earth Now More Dangerous Than Some War Zones

By Jayalaxshmi Mistry / Republished from The Conversation, CC license. Despite centuries of persecution, indigenous groups still manage or have tenure rights over at least a quarter of the world’s land surface. Often inhabiting these lands as far back as memory extends, they share a deep and unique connection to their environment. Recently released figures … Continue reading Defending Earth Now More Dangerous Than Some War Zones