Places Archives: Biomes

Deep seabed mining is risky. If something goes wrong, who will pay for it?

This story first appeared in Mongabay. Editor’s note: O Canada! Welcome to the new wild west. If you liked Deepwater Horizon you will love Deep Sea Mining. This statement pretty much sums it up, “countries could have their chance to EXPLOIT the valuable metals locked in the deep sea.” Corporations love to deal with poorer, less developed countries … Continue reading Deep seabed mining is risky. If something goes wrong, who will pay for it?

Climate change is muting fall colors, but it’s just the latest way that humans have altered US forests

This story first appeared in The Conversation. By Marc Abrams Fall foliage season is a calendar highlight in states from Maine south to Georgia and west to the Rocky Mountains. It’s especially important in the Northeast, where fall colors attract an estimated US$8 billion in tourism revenues to New England every year. As a forestry scientist, I’m often asked how climate … Continue reading Climate change is muting fall colors, but it’s just the latest way that humans have altered US forests

Deep Sea Defenders Call to Action

FOR DECADES, LARGE CORPORATIONS HAVE POISONED RIVERS, DEVASTATED FORESTS AND DISPLACED COMMUNITIES, AND NOW THEY’RE RUSHING TO MINE MINERALS FROM THE LAST UNTOUCHED FRONTIER ON THE PLANET – THE DEEP SEA. The deep-sea may be vast and unexplored, but it is incredibly important. It encompasses 75% of the ocean’s volume and is the largest and … Continue reading Deep Sea Defenders Call to Action

Changes to global fisheries subsidies could level the playing field for traditional coastline communities

This story first appeared in Mongabay. by Gladstone Taylor Community fishers struggle to hold their own against heavily-subsidized foreign fleets. Fisheries subsidies have long given wealthy nations an edge over Small Island Developing States (SIDS) like Jamaica that are rich in fishing traditions and natural resources. In places like the multigenerational fishing village of Manchioneal, Jamaica, … Continue reading Changes to global fisheries subsidies could level the playing field for traditional coastline communities

Solving for the wrong variable

This is an excerpt from the book Bright Green Lies, P. 20 ff By Derrick Jensen, Lierre Keith and Max Wilbert What this adds up to should be clear enough, yet many people who should know better choose not to see it. This is business-as- usual: the expansive, colonizing, progressive human narrative, shorn only of … Continue reading Solving for the wrong variable

Experts see no way back for NZ firm blocked from trying to mine the seabed

This story first appeared in Mongabay. By  Elizabeth Claire Alberts The New Zealand Supreme Court recently blocked consent for a seabed mining operation that would annually extract 50 million tons of iron ore from the seabed off the coast of South Taranaki. Environmentalists see this decision as a clear victory, but the mining company has … Continue reading Experts see no way back for NZ firm blocked from trying to mine the seabed

What It’s Like to Watch a Harpooned Whale Die Right Before Your Eyes

Author Paul Watson has no problem with critics calling him and his marine-life-defending colleagues pirates—it’s far better than helplessly standing by and doing nothing in the face of the violence against animals they have witnessed. This excerpt is from Death of a Whale, by Captain Paul Watson (GroundSwell Books, 2021). This web adaptation was produced by … Continue reading What It’s Like to Watch a Harpooned Whale Die Right Before Your Eyes

The Problem

This is an excerpt from the book Bright Green Lies, P. 1-7 By LIERRE KEITH “Once our authoritarian technics consolidates its powers, with the aid of its new forms of mass control, its panoply of tranquilizers and sedatives and aphrodisiacs, could democracy in any form survive? That question is absurd: Life itself will not survive, … Continue reading The Problem

Our Health Depends on Indigenous Botanical Knowledge and Plants That Are Rapidly Being Destroyed

This article originally appeared in Common Dreams. The decline is one of the effects of the industrial modernization that is supposed to have brought increasing comfort, health, and advanced knowledge into our lives. By JOHN BUELL Southwest Harbor, Maine (Special to Informed Comment) – While mainstream media celebrate the remarkable development in record time of vaccines … Continue reading Our Health Depends on Indigenous Botanical Knowledge and Plants That Are Rapidly Being Destroyed

Indigenous Environmental Defenders Shut Down Peruvian Crude Oil Pipeline

This article originally appeared in Common Dreams. By JULIA CONLEY “Not a single drop of oil is going to come out of the Amazon until the government takes care of us,” said campaigners. Demanding stronger social and environmental support in northern Peru’s Loreto region, about 200 Indigenous protesters on Wednesday announced a strike two days … Continue reading Indigenous Environmental Defenders Shut Down Peruvian Crude Oil Pipeline