Endgame Premises Archives: 11: Civilization is a culture of occupation

From the beginning, this culture—civilization—has been
a culture of occupation.

There are Hundreds of Thousands of Indigenous Children in Residential Schools Around the World Today

     by Jo Woodman and Alicia Kroemer / Intercontinental Cry On September 30, communities across Canada will be commemorating ‘Orange Shirt Day’, an annual event that is helping Canadians remember the thousands of Indigenous children who died in Residential Schools, and to reflect on the intergenerational trauma that was caused by the Residential school system. Similar school systems … Continue reading There are Hundreds of Thousands of Indigenous Children in Residential Schools Around the World Today

Squeeze Every Drop of Slave’s Blood Out of Ourselves

Editor’s note: this is an edited transcript of Derrick Jensen’s talk, which you can listen to here. What does it mean to decolonize my heart and mind, and how do I go about doing that?     by Derrick Jensen / Deep Green Resistance Many indigenous people have said to me that the first and … Continue reading Squeeze Every Drop of Slave’s Blood Out of Ourselves

Brazil: The Guarani and a Decade of Broken Promises

Featured image: The Guarani continue fighting for their land rights despite continuous attacks. © Fiona Watson/Survival International      by Survival International   Ten years ago the Brazilian government signed a landmark agreement with the Guarani tribe, which obliged it to identify all their ancestral lands. The core objective of the agreement, which was drawn up by the … Continue reading Brazil: The Guarani and a Decade of Broken Promises

Historic Ruling Set to Decide Future of Brazilian Tribes

Featured image: Brazil has seen frequent indigenous protests this year, against the anti-Indian policies of President Temer.  © Rogerio Assis      by Survival International Brazil’s Supreme Court will next week deliver a historic judgement on tribal territories which could strike the greatest blow to indigenous land rights since the country’s military dictatorship. The judgement will be … Continue reading Historic Ruling Set to Decide Future of Brazilian Tribes

The Sápara Nation vs. The Slimy Oil Mungia

Featured image: Sápara leader Gloria Ushigua. Photo: UN Women/Ryan Brown      by Sarah Belle Lin / Intercontinental Cry For the Sápara Peoples of the Ecuadorian Amazon, “Sinchi”, or “sacred” is the term that best describes their ancestral language and forests. Though abundant with meaning, the Sápara never had a word for “sacred”. There was … Continue reading The Sápara Nation vs. The Slimy Oil Mungia

One Does Not Hate When One Can Despise: On Donald Trump and How We Got Here

     by Derrick Jensen When I find myself in times of trouble, I’m less interested in Mother Mary’s wisdom than I am in Joe Hill’s: Don’t mourn; organize. There’s a sense in which Trump’s election is a surprise, similar to how we somehow seem to be continually surprised when easily predictable negative consequences of this … Continue reading One Does Not Hate When One Can Despise: On Donald Trump and How We Got Here

Obama’s Pettus Bridge

     by Noah Weber On Sunday, March 7, 1965, roughly 600 African Americans and their allies gathered and marched towards Montgomery, Alabama in order to take a stand and draw attention to the fact that 99% of Selma, Alabama’s registered voters were white, and that the African American community was being denied their legal … Continue reading Obama’s Pettus Bridge

Indigenous Resolve ‘Stronger Than Ever’ as Feds Order DAPL Protest Camp Shut Down

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Friday informed Indigenous water protectors and their allies that they have nine days to vacate the main Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp—or else face arrest. "This decision is necessary to protect the general public from the violent confrontation between protestors and law enforcement officials that have occurred in this area, and to prevent death, illness, or serious injury to inhabitants of encampments due to the harsh North Dakota winter conditions," Col. John Henderson of the Corps said in a letter to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe chairman Dave Archambault II. ... Continue reading →

More than a few bad apples: “Militarized neoliberalism” and the Canadian state in Latin America

Stories of bloody, degrading violence associated with Canadian mining operations abroad sporadically land on Canadian news pages. HudBay Minerals, Goldcorp, Barrick Gold, Nevsun and Tahoe Resources are some of the bigger corporate names associated with this activity. Sometimes our attention is held for a moment, sometimes at a stretch. It usually depends on what solidarity networks and under-resourced support groups can sustain in their attempts to raise the issues and amplify the voices of those affected by one of Canada’s most globalized industries. But even they only tell us part of the story. ... Continue reading →

The Mission to Stop the Sabal Trail Pipeline

In the early morning hours of Saturday, November 5th, water protectors from several different camps throughout Florida converged at an “action camp” to begin direct actions and multiple blockades to halt construction of the Sabal Trail Pipeline in Gilchrist County. They stopped the workers for a short time at the Santa Fe River near Gainesville by obstructing the path of trucks driving to the construction site. The pipeline workers, all from out of state were getting ready to bore a hole underneath the Santa Fe River to extend the pipeline to the opposite bank of the river. The blockade culminated in a police presence at the work site, but there were no arrests. At one point the water protectors marched onto the work site with signs. This direct action was planned by local landowners, members of the American Indian Movement, Our Santa Fe River, Earth First! and other groups. ... Continue reading →