Endgame Premises Archives: 1: Civilization can never be sustainable

Civilization is not and can never be sustainable. This is espe-
cially true for industrial civilization.

The Totalitarianism of Today — Part II

In this piece, Matej Kudláčik describes how a system that appears democratic, participatory, and free can actually conceal a profound totalitarianism. His argument has similarities to Sheldon Wolin’s conception of “inverted totalitarianism,” which Wolin described as being “all politics all of the time but politics largely untempered by the political. Party squabbles are occasionally on … Continue reading The Totalitarianism of Today — Part II

First Nations unite to fight industrial exploitation of Australia’s Martuwarra

This story first appeared in Mongabay. By Nick Rodway The Fitzroy River in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, one of the country’s most ecologically and culturally significant waterways, is facing proposals of further agriculture and mining development, including irrigation and fracking. In response, First Nations communities in the region have developed different methods to … Continue reading First Nations unite to fight industrial exploitation of Australia’s Martuwarra

Paths Forward: In Defense of “Utopian” Creativity (Part 2)

This story was first published in Learning Earthways. By George R Price. [Part 1 of this essay can be found here.] The points in time at which various ancient human societies began to go the wrong way (whether by force from outsiders, or by bad decisions made from within) are numerous and span thousands of … Continue reading Paths Forward: In Defense of “Utopian” Creativity (Part 2)

Whales Will Save the World’s Climate—Unless the Military Destroys Them First

This article was produced by Local Peace Economy, a project of the Independent Media Institute. By Koohan Paik-Mander The U.S. military is famous for being the single largest consumer of petroleum products in the world and the largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Its carbon emissions exceed those released by “more than 100 countries combined.” Now, with the Biden administration’s mandate to slash carbon … Continue reading Whales Will Save the World’s Climate—Unless the Military Destroys Them First

Human Rights Depend on a Thriving Natural World

This article first appeared in The Revelator. Editor’s note: It would seem like these rights would be self evident birth rights unrequiring of institutions agency. Unfortunately like all UN resolutions this carries no enforcement, see Palestine. How can enviromental justice come about? Rich nations must stop outsourcing their luxury lifestyle. This does not mean NIMBY Not … Continue reading Human Rights Depend on a Thriving Natural World

Update from Peehee Mu’huh / Thacker Pass

This story first appeared in Protect Thacker Pass. By Max Wilbert It’s been 10 months since I first arrived at Thacker Pass and began work to protect the land from a proposed open-pit lithium mine in earnest. Today I share this video reporting from the land and sharing reflections on where the movement to protect … Continue reading Update from Peehee Mu’huh / Thacker Pass

But… Cities?

This story first appeared in By My Solitary Hearth Editor’s note: Albuquerque is in fact too large. It is a city. It is actually the cities that are the cause of all those problems. This article mentions: “This idea that we need to set aside places for wilderness comes from the idea that humans are … Continue reading But… Cities?

Electric Vehicles: Back to the Future? [Part 2/2]

By Frédéric Moreau Read Part 1 of this article here. While the share of solar and wind power is tending to increase, overall energy consumption is rising from all sources — development, demography (a taboo subject that has been neglected for too long), and new uses, such as digital technology in all its forms (12% … Continue reading Electric Vehicles: Back to the Future? [Part 2/2]

Climate change is muting fall colors, but it’s just the latest way that humans have altered US forests

This story first appeared in The Conversation. By Marc Abrams Fall foliage season is a calendar highlight in states from Maine south to Georgia and west to the Rocky Mountains. It’s especially important in the Northeast, where fall colors attract an estimated US$8 billion in tourism revenues to New England every year. As a forestry scientist, I’m often asked how climate … Continue reading Climate change is muting fall colors, but it’s just the latest way that humans have altered US forests

Indigenous understanding of Salween River key for biodiversity

This story first appeared in The Third Pole. By Saw John Bright. This week, governments from around the world will convene online for the first part of the UN Biodiversity Summit COP15 (the second part will take place partially in-person in Kunming in spring), which will agree on the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework. Framed as … Continue reading Indigenous understanding of Salween River key for biodiversity