Places Archives: United States

Indigenous Leaders Hail Biden’s Proposed Chaco Canyon Drilling Ban as ‘Important First Step’

Editor’s note: We would hope that this action would be a turning point where the United States stops its management planning philosophy of “natural resources” and focuses on the protection of all living beings. Yet how tenative only 10-mile buffer for only 20 years and does not include all extractive industries. Basically less than undoing what Trump … Continue reading Indigenous Leaders Hail Biden’s Proposed Chaco Canyon Drilling Ban as ‘Important First Step’

Dakota Access Pipeline resister stands with integrity in face of long prison sentence

Sentenced to eight years in prison for acts of sabotage, water protector Jessica Reznicek reflects on her faith-driven resistance. By Cristina Yurena Zerr This article was first published in the German newspaper taz, and has been translated and edited for Waging Nonviolence. On June 28, the federal court in Des Moines, Iowa was silent and … Continue reading Dakota Access Pipeline resister stands with integrity in face of long prison sentence

Update from Peehee Mu’huh / Thacker Pass

This story first appeared in Protect Thacker Pass. By Max Wilbert It’s been 10 months since I first arrived at Thacker Pass and began work to protect the land from a proposed open-pit lithium mine in earnest. Today I share this video reporting from the land and sharing reflections on where the movement to protect … Continue reading Update from Peehee Mu’huh / Thacker Pass

Deep seabed mining is risky. If something goes wrong, who will pay for it?

This story first appeared in Mongabay. Editor’s note: O Canada! Welcome to the new wild west. If you liked Deepwater Horizon you will love Deep Sea Mining. This statement pretty much sums it up, “countries could have their chance to EXPLOIT the valuable metals locked in the deep sea.” Corporations love to deal with poorer, less developed countries … Continue reading Deep seabed mining is risky. If something goes wrong, who will pay for it?

Climate change is muting fall colors, but it’s just the latest way that humans have altered US forests

This story first appeared in The Conversation. By Marc Abrams Fall foliage season is a calendar highlight in states from Maine south to Georgia and west to the Rocky Mountains. It’s especially important in the Northeast, where fall colors attract an estimated US$8 billion in tourism revenues to New England every year. As a forestry scientist, I’m often asked how climate … Continue reading Climate change is muting fall colors, but it’s just the latest way that humans have altered US forests

These Indigenous Women Are Reclaiming Stolen Land in the Bay Area

This story was first published in YES! magazine. By Deonna Anderson. On a cool morning in December, Johnella LaRose stands in a 2-acre field in east Oakland, overseeing a group of volunteers preparing a section of this land that the Sogorea Te Land Trust stewards for the arrival of a shipping container. LaRose is dressed … Continue reading These Indigenous Women Are Reclaiming Stolen Land in the Bay Area

Every Day Is Columbus Day

Editor’s note: Colonialism has not ended. It is in full force. It is what civilization does. For this to end, governments must give the Land Back. All BLM, Forests and Park land should be returned to the sovereign Nations it was stolen from. Turtle Island is Treaty Land, ceded or unceded. Treaties are the Supreme … Continue reading Every Day Is Columbus Day

The disturbing history of how conservatorships were used to exploit, swindle Native Americans

This story first appeared in The Conversation. By Andrea Seielstad. Pop singer Britney Spears’ quest to end the conservatorship that handed control over her finances and health care to her father demonstrates the double-edged sword of putting people under the legal care and control of another person. A judge may at times deem it necessary to … Continue reading The disturbing history of how conservatorships were used to exploit, swindle Native Americans

Returning to the Roots of Community Resilience in Hawai‘i

This article first appeared in Yes! magazine. By LIBBY LEONARD There are four things you should know,” says David Fuertes to the youths he mentors. “You should know your origins, because your ancestors have paved the way. You should know your values and connect in those values, because that’s going to drive you to make … Continue reading Returning to the Roots of Community Resilience in Hawai‘i

Settlers Have an Obligation to Defend Treaty Rights, Too

This article originally appeared in YES! Magazine. BY ALEC CONNON & ERIKA LUNDAHL Shanai Matteson, a 39-year-old White settler, sat in the stuffy overflow room watching the packed Public Utility Commission meeting, along with more than a hundred others, in St. Paul, Minnesota, in June 2018. Over several hours, she listened as dozens of people—Native elders, local … Continue reading Settlers Have an Obligation to Defend Treaty Rights, Too